Tag Archives: Miriam Borden

Miriam Borden

PhD Student Contact miriam.borden@mail.utoronto.ca Office Hours Thu 1-2pm and by appointment, Centre for Jewish Studies (2nd floor, Jackman Humanities Building) Courses 2018-2019 GER260H FALL Elementary Yiddish, Monday, Wednesday, 2-4 Friday - 2pm-3pm Wednesday 2:00-4:00 in Jackman Humanities Building 235 Friday 2:00-3:00 in Jackman Humanities Building 100B Background I hold a B.A. in Jewish Studies (Hons., 2014) and an M.A. in Yiddish (2018) from the University of Toronto. My research interests are in the development and evolution of Yiddish as an ethnolinguistic identity of the organized institutional Jewish life in the Jewish community of Toronto in the postwar period. I am a researcher at the Ontario Jewish Archives Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, where I have worked as an Assistant Archivist, Yiddish translator, and tour guide for public tours of the historically Jewish (and Yiddish) Kensington Market neighbourhood. I have also written for the Canadian Jewish News on 20th century Jewish Torontonian culture in the Canadian Yiddish press. In the summer of 2017, I participated in the Naomi Prawer Kadar Yiddish Summer Program at Tel-Aviv University, and curated the exhibition “Discovering the Mame-loshn: The Hidden World of Yiddish at Robarts,” at Robarts Library (August 1-September 1, 2017). In May-July 2018 I curated ... Read More »

Florian Müller

PhD Student Contact florian.mueller@mail.utoronto.ca  Background I did my undergraduate in German Studies and History at Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt (Main) where I also received my master’s degree in German Studies in 2019. My doctoral research focuses on medieval and Early Modern German literature and I am especially interested in the relationship between early print and manuscript culture. Accordingly, I am enrolled in the collaborative program in Book History and Print Culture. In order to investigate how materiality informs the construction of text and vice versa, I am examining the 15th and 16th century manuscripts and printed editions comprising the so-called ‘Books of Heroes.’ This corpus transmits heroic poetry, a genre with a rich and multi-faceted literary history. Due to their seemingly dated nature – stanzaic form and archaic contents – the ‘Books of Heroes’ provide rich material for questions concerning transmission and canon formation, the dissemination of literature in the Early Modern period, the aesthetics of reception, and the materiality of texts. Since hands-on experience in letterpress printing is of immense value for my research, I am excited to be currently working as a printing apprentice at Massey College, where I am learning about typesetting, registration, presswork, distribution, ... Read More »