Undergraduate Courses

Spring 2018

Language Courses

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 TF102 W. Horsfall
L0201 MTWF 10-11 TF102 V. Curran
L0301 MTWF 11-12 TF102 K. Rabey
L0401 MTWF 12-1 TF102 T. Wilczek
*L0501 MTWF 1-2 TF102 J. Wakelin
L0601 MW 2-4 TF102 S. Oghatian
L0701 TR 10-12 VC215 Y. Aly
*L5101 MW 6-8 VC304 S. Gargova
L5102 MW 6-8 TF102 A. Warren
*L5201 TR 6-8 CR406 Y. Aly
L5202 TR 6-8 TF102 A. Warren

The GER 100Y language course is an introductory German course divided into two sections for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Based on a communicative and task-based approach, it is designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communication skills while providing students with knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultures of German-speaking countries. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of stimulating activities. Vocabulary will be presented in the context of culturally significant issues. Topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, travel, health and fitness or studying abroad. Additionally, the course will provide students with a foundation in a number of basic grammatical structures and concepts. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In addition to preparation at home, regular class attendance is paramount in order to participate successfully in these activities.

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 AH302 A. Warren
L0201 MTWF 10-11 TF201 M. Hager
L0301 MTWF 11-12 TF201 M. Hager
L5101 TR 6-8 TF101 E. Lange

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 CR405 H.-S. Kim
L0201 TR 12-2 AH302 V. Melnykevych
L5101 MW 6-8 TF101 M. Kumanatasan

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 260Y (YID) Elementary Yiddish

GER 260Y (YID) Elementary Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 10-12, F 1-2 OH323 A. Hoffman

This course is an introduction to the Yiddish language and culture of Ashkenazic Jews. It will begin to prepare you to be able to express yourself in Yiddish, acquire strategies to learn Yiddish independently by developing your ability to understand the structure of the language and to cue in on the features of spoken and written Yiddish.

GER 462HS (YID) Advanced Yiddish

GER 462HS (YID) Advanced Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 F 10-12 OH323 A. Hoffman

Advanced reading, writing, vocabulary and conversation. Study of poetry, short fiction and memoir literature by Zeitlin, Bergelson, Gladshteyn, Sholem Aleichem and I.B. Singer. Selected advanced grammatical topics presented in conjunction with the study of texts. (Conducted entirely in Yiddish.)

Topic Courses

GER 150HS (ENG) German Culture & Civilization

GER 150HS (ENG) German Culture & Civilization

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-4 VC115 P. Schweppe
Screenings: (TBA)

This course is for students who are pretty unfamiliar with German culture, and the goal is, simply put, to familiarize you with it. To do so, we’ll be highlighting various aspects of modern Germany: historical and cultural developments, poets and thinkers, radicals and liberals, scientists, artists and film stars, soccer players – and not to forget the Otto Normalverbraucher (i.e. the common man) who don’t make it into the headlines on a daily basis. What clichés abound about ‘Germany,’ how do we challenge them and take a look behind the façades? Will we find there anything more ‘real’? What is it about the Germans? Why are they hated? Why loved (Are they loved?) Or more to the point: Why is it so difficult to feel indifferent towards them? These are some of the questions we’ll be tackling this semester. The course puts you into the position of a culture detective whose task it is to explore in groups and on your own: You embark on a 12 – week mission, you collect evidence and reach conclusion. (Don’t take the analogy too far: There is no corpse! In fact, Germany is quite alive & kicking these days!) The course consists of lectures, viewing and discussing of film clips, group works and brief group presentations. In addition there is a one – hour tutorial each week.

GER 205HS (GER) Introduction to German Literature I

GER 205HS (GER) Introduction to German Literature I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 12-2, R 12-1 NF007 J. Noyes

This course offers an introduction to the study of literature in German. It is aimed at students who have been studying German language for 3 semesters, and are continuing with their 4th semester concurrently with the course. It is intended as a continuing course in language competence, but also an introduction to reading literature in German. We will be reading a number of short literary texts and a few non-fiction texts, specifically with the aim of expanding your working knowledge of the German language, and familiarizing yourself with the subtleties of literary language. As such, the course is meant to provide a transition from the study of language to the topic-based literature courses offered in undergraduate studies in German. Students will receive training in how to read and analyze texts, and how to understand “grammar at work” in literature. Classes will involve reading, discussions, group work, and exercises. Reading assignments will be in German. As far as possible, the classroom language will be German.

GER 220HS (ENG) German Literature in Translation

GER 220HS (ENG) German Literature in Translation

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 F 2-4 TBA H. Kim

GER 272HS (GER) Introduction to Business German

GER 272HS (GER) Introduction to Business German

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MWF 12-1 CR403 M. Hager

This course introduces students to basic concepts and vocabulary necessary for the German business context. All the language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) will be practiced in appropriate business contexts.

GER 310HS (GER) German Culture

GER 310HS (GER) German Culture

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-4 NF007 S. Soldovieri

Futur II is a grammatical tense (‘future perfect’ in English) that can be understood as combining the future and the past. It is a verbal form that throws up a challenge to the present in questions like ‘Wie wirst du gelebt haben?’ / ‘How will you have lived?’ How will we talk about the past in the future? The manner in which we have lived as human beings on this planet is the prime concern of our present Anthropocene. In this course we will consider artistic, cultural, technological, and social practices in German-speaking and global contexts that engage questions of sustainability and a livable future. Practical, creative, and reflective work is required.

GER 332HS (GER) Deviance, Madness, Outsiders in Literature

GER 332HS (GER) Deviance, Madness, Outsiders in Literature

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 2-4 CR405 C. Lehleiter

What does it mean to be sane? To be normal? To be human? Throughout modern history, writers have tested the limits of normal human experience by casting their protagonists into the depths of madness and following them through their trials, their elation, their despair. In a speech in 1970 Michel Foucault pointed out what he called “a curious affinity between literature and madness. Literary language is not constrained by the rules of everyday language. For example, it is not subject to the severe rule of constant truth-telling, any more than the teller is under the obligation to always remain sincere in what he thinks and feels. In short, unlike the words of politics or the sciences, those of literature occupy a marginal position with respect to everyday language.” Taking these ideas as our starting point, we will examine a number of texts written between 1800 and 1970. Our aim will be to analyze the literary descriptions of the limit experiences that separate sanity from madness. In the process, we will discuss topics such as truth and truth telling, exclusionary and assimilating practices for dealing with madness, discourses of containment, and how the outsider perspective of madness unsettles truth in literature.

GER 336HS (GER) Focus on Berlin

GER 336HS (GER) Focus on Berlin

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 T 6-8 NF006 A. Gerstner

Berlin is, and always was, multiple places, with shifting identities throughout the decades and a different perspective depending on specific groups of inhabitants (compare e.g. the Jewish, Multicultural, Gay Berlin). In this course, we will explore cultural and historical accounts of the city, putting the emphasis on the 20th century. Who are the people that shaped the German capital, its culture and language? What did “Weltstadt” Berlin of the 1920s contribute to modern culture, in Germany and around the world? We will also look into how writers and filmmakers from East and West portrayed the divided city and how the meaning of Berlin’s “Erinnerungsorte” (memory sites) has shifted over the past decades. Sessions will involve class discussions, group work, student presentations, and occasional lectures. The course is also designed to improve German language skills in reading, writing, and speaking with assignments, as well as class discussions, taking place in German. English will be used only be for purposes of clarification.

CCR 199HS (ENG) Cities, Real and Imagined

CCR 199HS (ENG) Cities, Real and Imagined

L0251 W 2-4 NF231 H.-S. Kim

Cities have been described as places of desire and places of fear. They pulse with life, bringing together people from different class, gender, and ethnic backgrounds, simultaneously giving rise to a sense of freedom and oppression, a sense of belonging and alienation. This course will explore the city as a physical reality that shapes our lives, but is also a projection of our deepest imaginings. Through readings of philosophical and sociological texts by influential theorists of the city, we will consider various ancient and modern conceptions of urban space and subjectivity. Alongside these theoretical readings, we will also examine literary and filmic representations of the city as a space of desire, memory and power.

M = Monday, T = Tuesday, W = Wednesday, R = Thursday, F = Friday