Undergraduate Courses

Spring 2017

Language Courses

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 AH302 A. Warren
L0201 MTWF 10-11 AH302 A. Warren
L0301 MTWF 11-12 AH302 A. Warren
*L0401 MTWF 12-1 AH302 S. Oghatian
L0501 MTWF 1-2 AH302 T. Sudenis
L0601 MW 2-4 AH302 S. Gargova
L0701 TR 10-12 CR406 D. Khamseh
*L5101 MW 6-8 CR406 A. Warren
L5102 MW 6-8 CR406 E. Luzi
*L5201 TR 6-8 AH302 T. Sudenis
*L5202 TR 6-8 CR406 J. Wakelin

The GER 100Y language course is an introductory German course divided into two sections for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Based on a communicative and task-based approach, it is designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communication skills while providing students with knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultures of German-speaking countries. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of stimulating activities. Vocabulary will be presented in the context of culturally significant issues. Topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, travel, health and fitness or studying abroad. Additionally, the course will provide students with a foundation in a number of basic grammatical structures and concepts. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In addition to preparation at home, regular class attendance is paramount in order to participate successfully in these activities.

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 TF102 K. Heinz
L0201 MTWF 10-11 TF102 H.-S. Kim
L0301 MTWF 11-12 TF102 M. Hager
L5101 TR 6-8 TF102 Y. Aly

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 CR403 D. Khamseh
L0201 TR 10-12 CR403 Y. Aly
L5101 MW 6-8 CR403 S. Gargova

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 260Y (ENG) Elementary Yiddish

GER 260Y (ENG) Elementary Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 10-12, F 10-11 OH323 A. Hoffman

This course is an introduction to the Yiddish language and culture of Ashkenazic Jews. It will begin to prepare you to be able to express yourself in Yiddish, acquire strategies to learn Yiddish independently by developing your ability to understand the structure of the language and to cue in on the features of spoken and written Yiddish.

GER 462HS (ENG) Advanced Yiddish

GER 462HS (ENG) Advanced Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 12-2 OH323 A. Hoffman

This course conducted entirely in Yiddish focuses on advanced reading, writing, vocabulary and conversation. We will workshop reading handwritten documents in Yiddish. We will analyze poetry and short fiction by Yiddish women authors. We will also go through selected advanced grammatical topics from Mordkhe Schaechter’s Yiddish II. We will, goes without saying, sing songs and play games.

Topic Courses

GER 205HS (GER) German Literature I

GER 205HS (GER) German Literature I

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 T 6-8, R 6-7 TF101 tba

This prerequisite course offers an introduction to work methods and skills pertaining to the study of German literature. As such, the course is meant to provide a transition from language to topic courses. Students will receive training in how to give a successful presentation, how to read and analyze texts, how to find secondary literature and how to write short papers. The course is required for majors and specialists and a pre-requisite course for most of the other topic courses. It should be taken as early as possible.

GER 275HS (ENG) Marx, Nietzsche, Freud

GER 275HS (ENG) Marx, Nietzsche, Freud

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-4 AH400 W. Goetschel
Tutorials: (students must also chose one tutorial)
T0101 R 12-1 AH204 tba
T0201 R 1-2 AH204 tba
T0301 R 2-3 AH204 tba

This is an introductory course to the thought of Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Sigmund Freud and their pioneering contributions to the understanding of the individual and society in modernity. Readings include selections from writings of the early Marx, the Communist Manifesto, and Capital, Nietzsche’s critique of culture, academe, and nationalism, and Freud’s theory of culture, his views on the psychopathology of everyday life, on the meaning of dreams, symptoms, the return of the repressed, and what it might mean to live in a free society.

GER 310HS (GER) Contemporary Media

GER 310HS (GER) Contemporary Media

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 3-5 NF007 S. Soldovieri

Futur II is a grammatical tense (‘future perfect’ in English) that can be understood as combining the future and the past. It is a tense that throws up a challenge to the present in questions like ‘Wie wirst du gelebt haben?’ / ‘How will you have lived?’ How will we talk about the past in the future? A moral question. The manner in which we have lived as human beings on this planet is perhaps the prime concern of our present Anthropocene. In this course we will engage artistic, cultural, technological, and social practices in German-speaking and global contexts that attempt to imaginatively explore and shape a different, sustainable future. Readings in range of media (literature, film, architecture, performance art, etc.). Practical, creative, and reflective work is required.

GER 336HS (GER) Focus on Berlin

GER 336HS (GER) Focus on Berlin

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 T 6-8 AH103 A. Gerstner

Berlin is, and always was, multiple places, with shifting identities throughout the decades and a different perspective depending on specific groups of inhabitants (compare e.g. the Jewish, Multicultural, Gay Berlin). In this course, we will explore cultural and historical accounts of the city, putting the emphasis on the 20th century. Who are the people that shaped the German capital, its culture and language? What did “Weltstadt” Berlin of the 1920s contribute to modern culture, in Germany and around the world? We will also look into how writers and filmmakers from East and West portrayed the divided city and how the meaning of Berlin’s “Erinnerungsorte” (memory sites) has shifted over the past decades. Sessions will involve class discussions, group work, student presentations, and occasional lectures. The course is also designed to improve German language skills in reading, writing, and speaking with assignments, as well as class discussions, taking place in German. English will be used only be for purposes of clarification.

GER 372HS (GER) German Business Culture 2

GER 372HS (GER) German Business Culture 2

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MWF 12-1 CR403 M. Hager

This course is designed as a fourth year language course for students who have completed at least the first three years of college German or the equivalent. Course objectives are to increase the student’s proficiency in the four skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) – with special emphasis on selected German business topics to help the student better understand the German business world.

GER 425HS (GER) Dreams-Desire-Delusions

GER 425HS (GER) Dreams-Desire-Delusions

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 1-3 NF231 C. Lehleiter

The closing years of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century saw some of the most innovative, radical and influential writing in the history of German literature and philosophy. In the stories, novels and poems of the Romantic period, but also in their theoretical writings, a generation gave expression to the sense of giddiness, awe and inspiration caused by a rapidly changing world. Modern life required a modern form of expression, and the Romantics wanted to do everything they could to find this form. This seminar follows them on their encounters with modernity. Our work in class will be shaped by class discussions, group work, and occasional lectures. Assignments and discussions will be in German.

GER 430HS (ENG) Critical Theory in Context: The French - German Connection

GER 430HS (ENG) Critical Theory in Context: The French - German Connection

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 3-5 AH105 W. Goetschel

This course examines central theoretical issues in contemporary thought with particular attention to the role that the “Frankfurt School” and its affiliates such as Benjamin, Kracauer, Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, Habermas and others play in the context of modern German social and cultural thought. In France, thinkers like Levinas, Foucault, and Derrida respond to this tradition and enrich it. The course explores in which way the continuing dialogue between these thinkers informs current critical approaches to rethinking issues and concerns such as theorizing modernity, culture, secularization, multiculturalism, and the vital role of cultural difference.

CCR 199Y (ENG) Cities, Real and Imagined

CCR 199Y (ENG) Cities, Real and Imagined

L0251 W 1-3 NF332 H.-S. Kim

Cities have been described as places of desire and places of fear. They pulse with life, bringing together people from different class, gender, and ethnic backgrounds, simultaneously giving rise to a sense of freedom and oppression, a sense of belonging and alienation. This course will explore the city as a physical reality that shapes our lives, but is also a projection of our deepest imaginings. Through readings of philosophical and sociological texts by influential theorists of the city, we will consider various ancient and modern conceptions of urban space and subjectivity. Alongside these theoretical readings, we will also examine literary and filmic representations of the city as a space of desire, memory and power.

 

M = Monday, T = Tuesday, W = Wednesday, R = Thursday, F = Friday