Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2018

Language Courses

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 TBA T. Wilczek
L0102 MTWF 9-10 TBA TBA
L0201 MTWF 10-11 TBA TBA
L0301 MW 11-1 TBA TBA
*L0401 MW 2-4 TBA TBA
L0501 TR 2-4 TBA TBA
L5101 MW 6-8 TBA TBA
*L5102 MW 6-8 TBA TBA
L5201 TR 6-8 TBA TBA
*L5202 TR 6-8 TBA TBA

The GER 100Y language course is an introductory German course divided into two sections for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Based on a communicative and task-based approach, it is designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communication skills while providing students with knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultures of German-speaking countries. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of stimulating activities. Vocabulary will be presented in the context of culturally significant issues. Topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, travel, health and fitness or studying abroad. Additionally, the course will provide students with a foundation in a number of basic grammatical structures and concepts. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In addition to preparation at home, regular class attendance is paramount in order to participate successfully in these activities.

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 TBA A. Warren
L0201 MTWF 11-12 TBA M. Hager
L0301 MW 2-4 TBA H.-S. Kim
L5101 TR 6-8 TBA A. Warren

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 TBA H.-S. Kim
L0201 TR 9-11 TBA E. Lange
L5101 MW 6-8 TBA TBA

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 400HF (GER) Advanced German

GER 400HF (GER) Advanced German

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 TBA TBA

This course is aimed at students with a high level of competence in German. Building on material covered in GER 100/200/300, it offers advanced studies of German language, including text-based analysis and with a focus on improving communication skills. It includes a systematic review and expansion of grammar and stylistics, and additional emphasis lies on vocabulary building. The course is partly based on newspaper articles, literary texts, films and websites.

GER 260Y (YID) Elementary Yiddish

GER 260Y (YID) Elementary Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MWF 2-3 TBA TBA

This course is an introduction to the Yiddish language and culture of Ashkenazic Jews. It will begin to prepare you to be able to express yourself in Yiddish, acquire strategies to learn Yiddish independently by developing your ability to understand the structure of the language and to cue in on the features of spoken and written Yiddish.

GER 360HF (YID) Intermediate Yiddish

GER 360HF (YID) Intermediate Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 12-1, F 10-12 TBA TBA

This course will build on the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired in beginner’s Yiddish. Emphasis will shift slightly towards reading, listening and speaking. We will read selections from folk tales, Glatshteyn’s Emil un karl (or another text), and finish College Yiddish. You will write compositions and summaries, acquire new vocabulary words, listen to recordings, watch films, and give presentations. We will sing and play games. We will also go on a tour of Yiddish-speaking Toronto (past and present).

Topic Courses – Fall 2018 and Spring 2019

GER 240F (ENG) German Drama in Translation

GER 240F (ENG) German Drama in Translation

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 R 10-12 TBA J. Noyes

This course offers a window into salient moments in 19th/20th century German drama. We study texts within their historical context in terms of such aspects as theme, plot, structure, characterization, style & language, and we examine aspects of their realization (& potential for realization) on stage. Course emphasis is on the reading & discussion of the texts. In addition, we pay attention to dramatic theory and to practical aspects of theater productions. Course Goals: Gain insight into the literary form of drama and the development of German drama, as well as its realization on stage and adaptation to film.

GER 290S (ENG) Global Issues: German Contexts

GER 290S (ENG) Global Issues: German Contexts

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 R 11-1 TBA S. Soldovieri

NEW COURSE! The movement of cultural products, material goods, capital, people, ideas, and information across national border s has resulted in a new quality of global inter dependency. The course examines the contemporary character of globalization with a special focus on its environmental impacts in German-speaking contexts. We consider artistic, cultural, technological, and social practices in German-speaking and global contexts that explore questions of sustainability and a livable future. The course is highly recommended as preparation for students interested in participating in the Department’s iPRAKTIKUM Internationalization & Experiential Learning internship program – particularly for placements with Eco-Hub Freiburg organizations in Germany. (Visit: http://german.utoronto.ca/ipraktikum/)

GER 310S (ENG) Contemporary Culture & Media

GER 310S (ENG) Contemporary Culture & Media

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 6-8 TBA S. Soldovieri

PREREQUISITE: GER 200Y This course provides students with the opportunity to encounter more advanced texts focusing on modern German culture, as expressed through a variety of media. It examines a range of issues that have changed the way we look at culture, as well as the impact of these changes on national identity. Based on thought provoking texts and visuals, the course offers a diverse view of German life based on reading selections from literary works, memoirs, newspaper reports, commentaries, and interdisciplinary materials which highlight important cultural movements.

GER 305F (GER) Introduction to German Literature II

GER 305F (GER) Introduction to German Literature II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 1-3, R 1-2 TBA E. Boran

This course provides an introduction to German literature and culture from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. Within a chronological framework, we will read and analyze excerpts from representative works of major German writers. Some of the literary texts will be complemented with examples selected from the visual arts, music and film. Throughout the course, our focus will be on three sets of questions: 1. What is the leading question of the text? 2. What are the formal means that the authors employ in order to express their concerns and to conceptualize the topic under discussion? 3. What is the historical and cultural context of the text? By asking these questions, we will not only strive to come to a better understanding of individual works, but also of German literature, its developments and themes. However, although the structure of this course is governed by literary periods, it will also be our aim to question their validity and definition. We will approach the texts with a combination of close readings and broad historical and cultural perspectives. Among the authors we will discuss are Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Joseph von Eichendorff, Franz Kafka, Irmgard Keun and Ilse Aichinger. In addition, we will work on our reading techniques for primary and secondary literature and improve our research skills in the university library system. Sessions involve class discussions, group work, readings, and occasional lectures.

GER 321HF (GER) 19th Century German Literature

GER 321HF (GER) 19th Century German Literature

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 2-4 TBA C. Lehleiter

When in 1899 an anonymous writer sent the New Year’s card displayed above, he could look back at a century that had brought enormous changes for the territory that today is Germany. Fighting against Napoleon, Germany’s national feelings had been strengthened and a German state had emerged from a conglomerate of small duchies governed by absolutist rulers. Political revolts had challenged these absolutistic forms of government and had started to replace it with a democratic state of classes. The composition of German society had changed dramatically as a result of the industrial revolution which had replaced traditional manufacturing with mass production by machines and with private capital. The human suffering and social challenges triggered by the industrial revolution had led to new political movements like communism and socialism. Despite these challenges, however, the century had been shaped by the belief in progress and the optimism that new scientific discoveries would lead to a better life for Germany and mankind. In this course, we will study how German authors reflected on these changes in literary, political and philosophical texts. Our work in class will be shaped by class discussions, group work, and occasional lectures. Assignments and discussions will be in German.

GER 338HF (GER) Narratives of the body

GER 338HF (GER) Narratives of the body

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 M 4-6 TBA J. Noyes

GER 361HF (GER) Yiddish Literature in Translation

GER 361HF (GER) Yiddish Literature in Translation

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 R 2-4 TBA A. Hoffman

GER 370F (GER) German Business Culture I

GER 370F (GER) German Business Culture I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MWF 12-1 TBA M. Hager

This course has been designed to provide students with practical experience setting up their own company while reviewing and supplementing material from Deutsch im Berufsalltag with information from other authentic texts. This course meets three times a week. “The project” found in Deutsch im Berufsalltag will be used as guidelines for setting up a fictive German company.

GER 372S (GER) German Business Culture II

GER 372S (GER) German Business Culture II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MWF 12-1 TBA M. Hager

This course is designed as a fourth year language course for students who have completed at least the first three years of college German or the equivalent. Course objectives are to increase the student’s proficiency in the four skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) – with special emphasis on selected German business topics to help the student better understand the German business world.

GER 410HF (ENG) Introduction to German Intellectual History

GER 410HF (ENG) Introduction to German Intellectual History

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 3-5 TBA W. Goetschel

German intellectual history has provided some of the most important statements in Western culture, from Kant to Hegel to Marx to Nietzsche to Heidegger to Freud to Adorno. The list could go on. In this course, we will examine key moments and themes from German intellectual history in its modern period—from the Enlightenment to the present. Taught in English and open to students across disciplines.

GER 430HF Stories of the Mind

GER 430HF Stories of the Mind

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 11-1 TBA C. Lehleiter

CCR199Y Poets and Power: Art under the Nazis

CCR199Y Poets and Power: Art under the Nazis

Section Time Room Instructor
L0251 M 11-1 NF332 J.Zilcosky

Did you know that Hitler was a failed artist? Goebbels a poet? Göring a collector of art? That there was an orchestra in Auschwitz? Why did art have this peculiar prominence under Nazism? In this course we will examine how politics and aesthetics interlace in various ways: the fascist cult of beauty; the theatrics of political propaganda; anti-Semitic “entertainment” film; and the eroticization of the Führer-figure. We will investigate this marriage between beauty and violence, and ask ourselves: what made Nazism so attractive to so many? We will begin by examining the great aesthetic movements from the pre-Nazi era through to Hitler’s 1937 ban on “degenerate,” modern art—in favor of returning to Greek and Roman images of beauty. Throughout the course, we will consider some of the high points of German culture—in philosophy, music, and literature—and ask: How did a society that produced such works of genius also create Nazism and the Holocaust? Are there any similar mixtures of art and politics in our world today?

M = Monday, T = Tuesday, W = Wednesday, R = Thursday, F = Friday