Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2017

Language Courses

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 TF102 W. Horsfall
L0201 MTWF 10-11 TF102 V. Curran
L0301 MTWF 11-12 TF102 D. Mezini
L0401 MTWF 12-1 TF102 S. Mostafa
*L0501 MTWF 1-2 TF102 R. Laszlo
L0601 MW 2-4 TF102 H.-S. Kim
L0701 TR 10-12 VC215 T. Wilczek
*L5101 MW 6-8 VC304 S. Gargova
L5102 MW 6-8 TF102 L. Cote-Pitre
*L5201 TR 6-8 CR406 C. Gerber
L5202 TR 6-8 TF102 V. Shewfelt

The GER 100Y language course is an introductory German course divided into two sections for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Based on a communicative and task-based approach, it is designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communication skills while providing students with knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultures of German-speaking countries. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of stimulating activities. Vocabulary will be presented in the context of culturally significant issues. Topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, travel, health and fitness or studying abroad. Additionally, the course will provide students with a foundation in a number of basic grammatical structures and concepts. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In addition to preparation at home, regular class attendance is paramount in order to participate successfully in these activities.

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 AH302 A. Warren
L0201 MTWF 10-11 TF201 M. Hager
L0301 MTWF 11-12 TF201 M. Hager
L5101 TR 6-8 TF101 E. Lange

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 CR405 H.-S. Kim
L0201 TR 12-2 AH302 W. Goetschel
L5101 MW 6-8 TF101 W. Ohm

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 400HF (GER) Advanced German

GER 400HF (GER) Advanced German

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 NF007 C. Lehleiter

This course is aimed at students with a high level of competence in German. Building on material covered in GER 100/200/300, it offers advanced studies of German language, including text-based analysis and with a focus on improving communication skills. It includes a systematic review and expansion of grammar and stylistics, and additional emphasis lies on vocabulary building. The course is partly based on newspaper articles, literary texts, films and websites.

GER 260Y (YID) Elementary Yiddish

GER 260Y (YID) Elementary Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 10-12, F 1-2 OH323 A. Hoffman

This course is an introduction to the Yiddish language and culture of Ashkenazic Jews. It will begin to prepare you to be able to express yourself in Yiddish, acquire strategies to learn Yiddish independently by developing your ability to understand the structure of the language and to cue in on the features of spoken and written Yiddish.

GER 360HF (YID) Intermediate Yiddish

GER 360HF (YID) Intermediate Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 12-1, F 10-12 OH323 A. Hoffman

This course will build on the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired in beginner’s Yiddish. Emphasis will shift slightly towards reading, listening and speaking. We will read selections from folk tales, Glatshteyn’s Emil un karl (or another text), and finish College Yiddish. You will write compositions and summaries, acquire new vocabulary words, listen to recordings, watch films, and give presentations. We will sing and play games. We will also go on a tour of Yiddish-speaking Toronto (past and present).

Topic Courses

GER 250HF (ENG) Topics in German Film History: Women’s Film Authorship in Contemporary German Cinema

GER 250HF (ENG) Topics in German Film History: Women’s Film Authorship in Contemporary German Cinema

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 4-8 (incl. 2 hours of viewing) Media Commons Theatre A. Fenner

This course draws inspiration from Maren Ade’s recently acclaimed film, Toni Erdmann (2016), whose nomination for an Academy Award has brought renewed attention to women’s film authorship in Germany and a growing cadre of directors making films that are engaging, intelligent, and deeply thought-provoking without being didactic. Via readings in feminist film theory, new materialism, animal studies, gender and queer theory, and cultural studies, we will place these compelling contemporary productions into conversation with those of pioneers the feminist film movement of the 1970s, such as Helke Sander and Ulrike Ottinger. Echoes of that movement are, for example, evidenced in the way Maren Ade has leveraged her success to draw public attention to imbalances within the German film industry and called for gender parity in the distribution of subsidies. With an eye towards both continuities and divergencies in aesthetics, mode of production, and culture, we will investigate to what extent recent German and Austrian directors, e.g. Barbara Albert, Angela Schanelec, Valeska Grisebach, Tanja Turanskyj, and others share among themselves and/or with an earlier generation a common focus on disparate experiences of gender, sexuality, intimacy, and precarity. How does their work – feature films, fun and funky experimental works, and documentary — accord with such labels as ‘oppositional,’ ‘subversive, or ‘resistant’, and in what ways does it enact intersectional alliances with feminist, queer, anti-heteronormative and anti-racist projects?

GER 270HF (ENG) Money and Economy

GER 270HF (ENG) Money and Economy

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 2-4, W 3-4 CR406 C. Lehleiter

In this course, we examine key literary, philosophical, and cultural texts, in order to understand how modern culture approaches problems such as property, debt, and exchange value.

GER 305HF (GER) Introduction to German Literature II

GER 305HF (GER) Introduction to German Literature II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 4-6, W 4-5 VC212 Y. Aly

This course provides an introduction to German literature and culture from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. Within a chronological framework, we will read and analyze excerpts from representative works of major German writers. Some of the literary texts will be complemented with examples selected from the visual arts, music and film. Throughout the course, our focus will be on three sets of questions: 1. What is the leading question of the text? 2. What are the formal means that the authors employ in order to express their concerns and to conceptualize the topic under discussion? 3. What is the historical and cultural context of the text? By asking these questions, we will not only strive to come to a better understanding of individual works, but also of German literature, its developments and themes. However, although the structure of this course is governed by literary periods, it will also be our aim to question their validity and definition. We will approach the texts with a combination of close readings and broad historical and cultural perspectives. Among the authors we will discuss are Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Joseph von Eichendorff, Franz Kafka, Irmgard Keun and Ilse Aichinger. In addition, we will work on our reading techniques for primary and secondary literature and improve our research skills in the university library system. Sessions involve class discussions, group work, readings, and occasional lectures.

GER 320HF (GER) The Age of Goethe

GER 320HF (GER) The Age of Goethe

Section Time Room Instructor
T0101 M 12-2 NF007 J. Noyes

When Germany’s most famous poet, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, died at the age of 82, he had seen German literature move through the most innovative, daring and experimental stage of its entire history. Between the years 1774, when he published his first novel, and 1832, when – just months before his death – he completed Faust, the literary world was torn between the revival of classical aesthetics and the shock of the new. Storm and Stress, Romanticism, and various other movements forced the reading public to ask difficult questions about what literature was, what it could do, and how to read it. In this course we will take a tour through some of the salient moments in this age of innovation, under the headings of Reason and Passion, Revolution and Reform, Education, Cultural Difference and Humanity, Science and the Psyche, Men and Women.
We will read works by Goethe, Friedrich Schiller, Alexander von Humboldt, Johann Gottfried Herder, Friedrich Hölderlin, Friedrich Schlegel, Novalis and others.

GER 322HF (GER) Kafka in Context

GER 322HF (GER) Kafka in Context

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-4 VC304 J. Zilcosky

How do we know how to live life in the modern world, when none of our points of reference seem to hold any reliability or stability? How can we even be sure that we are human—and not some strange, deformed animal with consciousness? Are we perhaps moving through life in a dream, or a nightmare? For Kafka, the German-Jewish-Czech writer who lived most of his life in Prague, the only way to answer these and other similarly troubling questions was to transform them into literature. His works offer unique models for thinking about human life in the modern world, about the mind, the body, dreaming and waking, and the nature of the social world. And embedded in his writing is a set of inimitable ideas about how to read literature. In this course we will set out in pursuit of these models and ideas.

GER 323HF (GER) Weimar Culture & Beyond

GER 323HF (GER) Weimar Culture & Beyond

Section Time Room Instructor
T0101 W 1-3 NF006 C. Lehleiter

The political instability of the Weimar Republic, fueled by the effects of the Global Economic Crisis, facilitated Hitler’s election in 1933. Yet at the same time it was a period of extraordinary political, social and artistic achievements. Expressionism, Dada, Neue Sachlichkeit, Bauhaus, and the Golden Age of German Film are some of the buzz words which belong to the legacy of Weimar. This course studies literary, historical, and artistic documents of this extremely significant period in German history.

GER 411HF Introduction to Critical Theory (ENG)

GER 411HF Introduction to Critical Theory (ENG)

Section Time Room Instructor
T0101 W 3-5 AH204 J. Noyes

Critical theory as developed by the so-called Frankfurt School is an attempt to formulate a philosophical response to the problem of injustice in the modern world. Its basic idea has been described (by Terry Pinkard) as “extracting the conceptions necessary for the actualization of freedom from out of the existing dynamic of social life itself.” This advanced undergraduate seminar examines problems of freedom, forms of living, history, reason, and other key concepts discussed by the Frankfurt School and expanded on by subsequent critical theorists. We will examine the premises and strategies of critical theory under the headings of Enlightenment, History, Public, and Mediated Consciousness. Our aim will be to show how these central concepts emerged, and how they figure in critical theory. We will read works by Kant and Marx, as well as the first generation of critical theorists, focusing on Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer. We’ll also study subsequent generations of Frankfurt School theorists, including Herbert Marcuse, Jürgen Habermas and Axel Honneth. In order to situate critical theory in an age of global capitalism, a digital age, a media age and a postcolonial age, we will also read select writings by Hans-Ulrich Gumbrecht, Rahel Jaeggi, Oskar Negt, Alexander Kluge, Amy Allen and Nancy Fraser. Class language is English. Texts are available in English and German.

GER 423HF (GER) Transnational Literatures

GER 423HF (GER) Transnational Literatures

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 4-6 CR103 / OH323 E. Boran

This course looks at the 50+ year cultural history of Germany?s largest ethnic minority. Starting in the 1960s, Turks first came as labour migrants (?guest workers?) and later, in the 1980s, as asylum seekers; there were always artists among them. With them new impulses and perspectives reached German culture. First in Turkish, but soon also in German the migrants reacted to and interacted with their new surroundings. Over the years a vibrant Turkish-German cultural scene developed. Comparable to the political realm, their cultural integration was filled with challenges and obstacles. Nonetheless artists of Turkish origin have since become such an integral part of Germany?s cultural landscape that the scholar Leslie Adelson talks about a Turkish turn of German literature. This development is not restricted to literature, but also encompasses film, political cabaret, stand-up comedy, rap and hip-hop, etc.

GER 426HF (GER) Introduction to Medieval German

GER 426HF (GER) Introduction to Medieval German

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 F 2-4 AH302 M. Stock

This course offers an introduction to the German language, literature, and culture of the Middle Ages. We will read and translate Middle High German texts, study facsimiles of medieval manuscripts, and inquire into epochal cultural concepts like courtly love and chivalry as well as courtly and clerical designs of identity. Authors discussed will include Hartmann von Aue and Walther von der Vogelweide among others. The course fulfills the departmental requirement in Middle High German.

CCR 199HF (ENG) Our Vampires, Ourselves

CCR 199HF (ENG) Our Vampires, Ourselves

L0251 R 10-12 NF007 E. Boran

This course examines the figure of the vampire as a potent cultural metaphor showing how every age embraces the vampire it needs and gets the vampire it deserves. Our course consists of three parts:
1. First we focus on the best-known and most influential vampire novel: Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). We critically engage with the Stoker paradigm and learn about Victorian times, issues of race and colonization, sex and gender, illness, religion and the Enlightenment, as well as the novel’s relevance for today’s vampires and readers.
2. Next we investigate a German novel that introduces a rather unusual vampire figure: Patrick Süskind’s The Perfume (1985). Instead of drinking his victims’ blood, he inhales their scents – but still killing them in the process. Where Dracula represented, among other things, an archaic past that comes to haunt the present, Süskind’s Grenouille (‘frog’) personifies the dark side of Enlightenment.
3. Finally we probe contemporary representations of the vampire. This part is substantially driven by student presentations, which allows participants to develop and share their own interests and points-of-view, as well as raise relevant questions. Throughout the course we reflect on issues of self and society and develop a structured approach to critical thinking. Attention: There will be four film screenings scheduled outside of class, either on Mondays or Wednesdays 7-9:30pm (to be determined in class). Attendance is mandatory.

CCR 199HF (ENG) Common Humanity

CCR 199HF (ENG) Common Humanity

L0252 R 10-12 VC206 J. Noyes
Since antiquity, philosophers and writers have struggled to understand what humans have in common. This is a matter of fundamental importance to society, since it determines how laws are formulated, how other cultures are treated, and it ultimately grounds the idea of human rights. We will begin with an overview of the idea of common humanity in the Western tradition. Then we will examine the Enlightenment, a period in which most of the modern positions on common humanity were formulated. Following that, we will ask what the idea of common humanity means for societies whose past is marked by racial injustice and exploitation. In this connection we will pursue an understanding of common humanity in indigenous thought in Canada. What can Canadians schooled in the western tradition learn from this? Finally, we will take as a case study South Africa in the decades after the end of apartheid. The question here will be: how does the idea of common humanity relate to the persistence of racial inequality? And can the ideal of common humanity survive the leveling effects of the global economy?

Spring 2018

Language Courses

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 TF102 A. Bowes
L0201 MTWF 10-11 TF102 V. Curran
L0301 MTWF 11-12 TF102 K. Rabey
L0401 MTWF 12-1 TF102 T. Wilczek
*L0501 MTWF 1-2 TF102 D. Khamseh
L0601 MW 2-4 TF102 S. Oghatian
L0701 TR 10-12 VC215 Y. Aly
*L5101 MW 6-8 VC304 S. Gargova
L5102 MW 6-8 TF102 A. Warren
*L5201 TR 6-8 CR406 Y. Aly
L5202 TR 6-8 TF102 A. Warren

The GER 100Y language course is an introductory German course divided into two sections for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Based on a communicative and task-based approach, it is designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communication skills while providing students with knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultures of German-speaking countries. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of stimulating activities. Vocabulary will be presented in the context of culturally significant issues. Topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, travel, health and fitness or studying abroad. Additionally, the course will provide students with a foundation in a number of basic grammatical structures and concepts. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In addition to preparation at home, regular class attendance is paramount in order to participate successfully in these activities.

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 AH302 A. Warren
L0201 MTWF 10-11 TF201 M. Hager
L0301 MTWF 11-12 TF201 M. Hager
L5101 TR 6-8 TF101 E. Lange

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 CR405 H.-S. Kim
L0201 TR 12-2 AH302 TBA
L5101 MW 6-8 TF101 TBA

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 260Y (YID) Elementary Yiddish

GER 260Y (YID) Elementary Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 10-12, F 1-2 OH323 A. Hoffman

This course is an introduction to the Yiddish language and culture of Ashkenazic Jews. It will begin to prepare you to be able to express yourself in Yiddish, acquire strategies to learn Yiddish independently by developing your ability to understand the structure of the language and to cue in on the features of spoken and written Yiddish.

GER 462HS (YID) Advanced Yiddish

GER 462HS (YID) Advanced Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 F 10-12 OH323 A. Hoffman

Advanced reading, writing, vocabulary and conversation. Study of poetry, short fiction and memoir literature by Zeitlin, Bergelson, Gladshteyn, Sholem Aleichem and I.B. Singer. Selected advanced grammatical topics presented in conjunction with the study of texts. (Conducted entirely in Yiddish.)

Topic Courses

GER 150HS (ENG) German Culture & Civilization

GER 150HS (ENG) German Culture & Civilization

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-4 EM001 TBA
Tutorials: (students must also chose one tutorial)
T0101 R 1-2 TF102 TBA
T0201 R 2-3 TF103 TBA
T0301 R 3-4 UC67 TBA

This course is for students who are pretty unfamiliar with German culture, and the goal is, simply put, to familiarize you with it. To do so, we’ll be highlighting various aspects of modern Germany: historical and cultural developments, poets and thinkers, radicals and liberals, scientists, artists and film stars, soccer players – and not to forget the Otto Normalverbraucher (i.e. the common man) who don’t make it into the headlines on a daily basis. What clichés abound about ‘Germany,’ how do we challenge them and take a look behind the façades? Will we find there anything more ‘real’? What is it about the Germans? Why are they hated? Why loved (Are they loved?) Or more to the point: Why is it so difficult to feel indifferent towards them? These are some of the questions we’ll be tackling this semester. The course puts you into the position of a culture detective whose task it is to explore in groups and on your own: You embark on a 12 – week mission, you collect evidence and reach conclusion. (Don’t take the analogy too far: There is no corpse! In fact, Germany is quite alive & kicking these days!) The course consists of lectures, viewing and discussing of film clips, group works and brief group presentations. In addition there is a one – hour tutorial each week.

GER 205HS (GER) Introduction to German Literature I

GER 205HS (GER) Introduction to German Literature I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 12-2, R 12-1 NF007 J. Noyes

This course offers an introduction to the study of literature in German. It is aimed at students who have been studying German language for 3 semesters, and are continuing with their 4th semester concurrently with the course. It is intended as a continuing course in language competence, but also an introduction to reading literature in German. We will be reading a number of short literary texts and a few non-fiction texts, specifically with the aim of expanding your working knowledge of the German language, and familiarizing yourself with the subtleties of literary language. As such, the course is meant to provide a transition from the study of language to the topic-based literature courses offered in undergraduate studies in German. Students will receive training in how to read and analyze texts, and how to understand “grammar at work” in literature. Classes will involve reading, discussions, group work, and exercises. Reading assignments will be in German. As far as possible, the classroom language will be German.

GER 220HS (ENG) German Literature in Translation

GER 220HS (ENG) German Literature in Translation

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 F 2-4 TBA H. Kim

GER 272HS (GER) Introduction to Business German

GER 272HS (GER) Introduction to Business German

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MWF 12-1 CR403 M. Hager

This course introduces students to basic concepts and vocabulary necessary for the German business context. All the language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) will be practiced in appropriate business contexts.

GER 310HS (GER) German Culture

GER 310HS (GER) German Culture

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-4 NF007 S. Soldovieri

Futur II is a grammatical tense (‘future perfect’ in English) that can be understood as combining the future and the past. It is a verbal form that throws up a challenge to the present in questions like ‘Wie wirst du gelebt haben?’ / ‘How will you have lived?’ How will we talk about the past in the future? The manner in which we have lived as human beings on this planet is the prime concern of our present Anthropocene. In this course we will consider artistic, cultural, technological, and social practices in German-speaking and global contexts that engage questions of sustainability and a livable future. Practical, creative, and reflective work is required.

GER 332HS (GER) Deviance, Madness, Outsiders in Literature

GER 332HS (GER) Deviance, Madness, Outsiders in Literature

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 2-4 CR405 C. Lehleiter

What does it mean to be sane? To be normal? To be human? Throughout modern history, writers have tested the limits of normal human experience by casting their protagonists into the depths of madness and following them through their trials, their elation, their despair. In a speech in 1970 Michel Foucault pointed out what he called “a curious affinity between literature and madness. Literary language is not constrained by the rules of everyday language. For example, it is not subject to the severe rule of constant truth-telling, any more than the teller is under the obligation to always remain sincere in what he thinks and feels. In short, unlike the words of politics or the sciences, those of literature occupy a marginal position with respect to everyday language.” Taking these ideas as our starting point, we will examine a number of texts written between 1800 and 1970. Our aim will be to analyze the literary descriptions of the limit experiences that separate sanity from madness. In the process, we will discuss topics such as truth and truth telling, exclusionary and assimilating practices for dealing with madness, discourses of containment, and how the outsider perspective of madness unsettles truth in literature.

GER 336HS (GER) Focus on Berlin

GER 336HS (GER) Focus on Berlin

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 T 6-8 NF006 A. Gerstner

Berlin is, and always was, multiple places, with shifting identities throughout the decades and a different perspective depending on specific groups of inhabitants (compare e.g. the Jewish, Multicultural, Gay Berlin). In this course, we will explore cultural and historical accounts of the city, putting the emphasis on the 20th century. Who are the people that shaped the German capital, its culture and language? What did “Weltstadt” Berlin of the 1920s contribute to modern culture, in Germany and around the world? We will also look into how writers and filmmakers from East and West portrayed the divided city and how the meaning of Berlin’s “Erinnerungsorte” (memory sites) has shifted over the past decades. Sessions will involve class discussions, group work, student presentations, and occasional lectures. The course is also designed to improve German language skills in reading, writing, and speaking with assignments, as well as class discussions, taking place in German. English will be used only be for purposes of clarification.

GER 350HS (GER) German Visual Cultures

GER 350HS (GER) German Visual Cultures

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 W 1-5 AH107 TBA

CCR 199HS (ENG) Cities, Real and Imagined

CCR 199HS (ENG) Cities, Real and Imagined

L0251 W 2-4 NF231 H.-S. Kim

Cities have been described as places of desire and places of fear. They pulse with life, bringing together people from different class, gender, and ethnic backgrounds, simultaneously giving rise to a sense of freedom and oppression, a sense of belonging and alienation. This course will explore the city as a physical reality that shapes our lives, but is also a projection of our deepest imaginings. Through readings of philosophical and sociological texts by influential theorists of the city, we will consider various ancient and modern conceptions of urban space and subjectivity. Alongside these theoretical readings, we will also examine literary and filmic representations of the city as a space of desire, memory and power.

M = Monday, T = Tuesday, W = Wednesday, R = Thursday, F = Friday