Past Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2016

Fall 2016

Language Courses

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 AH302 T. Wilczek
L0201 MTWF 10-11 AH302 M. Hager
L0301 MTWF 11-12 AH302 A. Bowes
*L0401 MTWF 12-1 AH302 L. Pehar
L0501 MTWF 1-2 AH302 V. Curran
L0601 MW 2-4 AH302 H.-S. Kim
L0701 TR 10-12 CR406 L. Pehar
*L5101 MW 6-8 CR406 W. Horsfall
L5102 MW 6-8 AH302 L. Cote-Pitre
*L5201 TR 6-8 CR406 E. Lange
L5202 TR 6-8 AH302 S. Gargova

The GER 100Y language course is an introductory German course divided into two sections for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Based on a communicative and task-based approach, it is designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communication skills while providing students with knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultures of German-speaking countries. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of stimulating activities. Vocabulary will be presented in the context of culturally significant issues. Topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, travel, health and fitness or studying abroad. Additionally, the course will provide students with a foundation in a number of basic grammatical structures and concepts. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In addition to preparation at home, regular class attendance is paramount in order to participate successfully in these activities.

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 TF102 L. Pehar
L0201 MTWF 10-11 TF102 H.-S. Kim
L0301 MTWF 11-12 TF102 M. Hager
L5101 TR 6-8 TF102 W. Ohm

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 CR403 V. Rummel
L0201 TR 10-12 CR403 T. Sudenis
L5101 MW 6-8 CR403 C. Bohnke

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 400HF (GER) Advanced German

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 VC212 Y. Aly

This course is aimed at students with a high level of competence in German. Building on material covered in GER 100/200/300, it offers advanced studies of German language, including text-based analysis and with a focus on improving communication skills. It includes a systematic review and expansion of grammar and stylistics, and additional emphasis lies on vocabulary building. The course is partly based on newspaper articles, literary texts, films and websites.

GER 260Y (YID) Elementary Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 10-12, F 10-11 OH323 V. Lightstone

This course is an introduction to the Yiddish language and culture of Ashkenazic Jews. It will begin to prepare you to be able to express yourself in Yiddish, acquire strategies to learn Yiddish independently by developing your ability to understand the structure of the language and to cue in on the features of spoken and written Yiddish.

GER 360HF (YID) Intermediate Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 10-12, F 10-11 NF205 A. Hoffman

This course will build on the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired in beginner’s Yiddish. Emphasis will shift slightly towards reading, listening and speaking. We will read selections from folk tales, Glatshteyn’s Emil un karl (or another text), and finish College Yiddish. You will write compositions and summaries, acquire new vocabulary words, listen to recordings, watch films, and give presentations. We will sing and play games. We will also go on a tour of Yiddish-speaking Toronto (past and present).

Topic Courses

GER 150HF (ENG) German Culture & Civilization

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 4-6 AH400 E. Boran
Tutorials: (students must also chose one tutorial)
T0101 W 4-5 AH204 tba
T0201 W 4-5 AH206 tba
T5101 W 5-6 AH204 tba
T5102 W 5-6 AH206 tba

This course is for students who are pretty unfamiliar with German culture, and the goal is, simply put, to familiarize you with it. To do so, we’ll be highlighting various aspects of modern Germany: historical and cultural developments, poets and thinkers, radicals and liberals, scientists, artists and film stars, soccer players – and not to forget the Otto Normalverbraucher (i.e. the common man) who don’t make it into the headlines on a daily basis. What clichés abound about ‘Germany,’ how do we challenge them and take a look behind the façades? Will we find there anything more ‘real’? What is it about the Germans? Why are they hated? Why loved (Are they loved?) Or more to the point: Why is it so difficult to feel indifferent towards them? These are some of the questions we’ll be tackling this semester. The course puts you into the position of a culture detective whose task it is to explore in groups and on your own: You embark on a 12 – week mission, you collect evidence and reach conclusion. (Don’t take the analogy too far: There is no corpse! In fact, Germany is quite alive & kicking these days!) The course consists of lectures, viewing and discussing of film clips, group works and brief group presentations. In addition there is a one – hour tutorial each week.

GER 305HF (GER) Introduction to German Literature II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 1-3, W 1-2 TF202 M. Burks

This course provides an introduction to German literature and culture from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. Within a chronological framework, we will read and analyze excerpts from representative works of major German writers. Some of the literary texts will be complemented with examples selected from the visual arts, music and film. Throughout the course, our focus will be on three sets of questions: 1. What is the leading question of the text? 2. What are the formal means that the authors employ in order to express their concerns and to conceptualize the topic under discussion? 3. What is the historical and cultural context of the text? By asking these questions, we will not only strive to come to a better understanding of individual works, but also of German literature, its developments and themes. However, although the structure of this course is governed by literary periods, it will also be our aim to question their validity and definition. We will approach the texts with a combination of close readings and broad historical and cultural perspectives. Among the authors we will discuss are Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Joseph von Eichendorff, Franz Kafka, Irmgard Keun and Ilse Aichinger. In addition, we will work on our reading techniques for primary and secondary literature and improve our research skills in the university library system. Sessions involve class discussions, group work, readings, and occasional lectures.

GER 321HF (GER) 19th Century German Literature

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 3-5 TF102 C. Lehleiter

When in 1899 an anonymous writer sent the New Year’s card displayed above, he could look back at a century that had brought enormous changes for the territory that today is Germany. Fighting against Napoleon, Germany’s national feelings had been strengthened and a German state had emerged from a conglomerate of small duchies governed by absolutist rulers. Political revolts had challenged these absolutistic forms of government and had started to replace it with a democratic state of classes. The composition of German society had changed dramatically as a result of the industrial revolution which had replaced traditional manufacturing with mass production by machines and with private capital. The human suffering and social challenges triggered by the industrial revolution had led to new political movements like communism and socialism. Despite these challenges, however, the century had been shaped by the belief in progress and the optimism that new scientific discoveries would lead to a better life for Germany and mankind. In this course, we will study how German authors reflected on these changes in literary, political and philosophical texts. Our work in class will be shaped by class discussions, group work, and occasional lectures. Assignments and discussions will be in German.

GER 340HF (GER) German Theater Production

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 MW 6-9 NF003 E. Boran

The goal of this course is to stage a German theatre production! It consists of classroom sessions, theater workshops, rehearsal sessions and public performances. It is held entirely in German. We focus on reading, interpreting, contextualizing, rehearsing and staging a play. In the process, students become familiar with the different steps of a theater production – from read – through to dress rehearsal and preview to the performance, as well as the various responsibilities that go along with any production, such as playbills, programs, costumes, set, sound & lights and dramaturgy. The course focuses on the German language through repetition & creative practice.

GER 367HF (ENG) Introduction to Yiddish Humour

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 12-2 OH323 A. Hoffman

What is Jewish about humour and what is humorous about Ashkenazi Jewishness? What’s so funny about Yiddish? Why does it sound better in Yiddish? These are the basic questions that inspire this course. To experience the richness of Jewish European humour, we will analyze a variety of humorous genres (short fiction, film, stand-up, jokes, music) using a variety of analytical perspectives (historical, psychological, ethnographic, queer, and literary). A central theme will be the ways in which humour, through translation and adaptation, accompanied Jewish migrations within Europe and beyond.

GER 370HF (GER) German Business Culture 1

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MWF 12-1 CR403 M. Hager

This course has been designed to provide students with practical experience setting up their own company while reviewing and supplementing material from Deutsch im Berufsalltag with information from other authentic texts. This course meets three times a week. “The project” found in Deutsch im Berufsalltag will be used as guidelines for setting up a fictive German company.

GER 410HF (ENG) Introduction to German Intellectual History

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 3-5 NF235 J. Zilcosky

German intellectual history has provided some of the most important statements in Western culture, from Kant to Hegel to Marx to Nietzsche to Heidegger to Freud to Adorno. The list could go on. In this course, we will examine key moments and themes from German intellectual history in its modern period—from the Enlightenment to the present. Taught in English and open to students across disciplines.

CCR 199Y (ENG) Poets and Power

Section Time Room Instructor
L0251 M 11-1 VC304 J. Zilcosky

Did you know that Hitler was a failed artist? Goebbels a poet? Göring a collector of art? That there was an orchestra in Auschwitz? Why did art have this peculiar prominence under Nazism? In this course we will examine how politics and aesthetics interlace in various ways: the fascist cult of beauty; the theatrics of political propaganda; anti-Semitic “entertainment” film; and the eroticization of the Führer-figure. We will investigate this marriage between beauty and violence, and ask ourselves: what made Nazism so attractive to so many? We will begin by examining the great aesthetic movements from the pre-Nazi era through to Hitler’s 1937 ban on “degenerate,” modern art—in favor of returning to Greek and Roman images of beauty. Throughout the course, we will consider some of the high points of German culture—in philosophy, music, and literature—and ask: How did a society that produced such works of genius also create Nazism and the Holocaust? Are there any similar mixtures of art and politics in our world today?

CCR 199HF (ENG) Our Vampires, Ourselves

L0251 T 2-4 SS1069 E. Boran

This course examines the figure of the vampire as a potent cultural metaphor showing how every age embraces the vampire it needs and gets the vampire it deserves. Our course consists of three parts:
1. First we focus on the best-known and most influential vampire novel: Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). We critically engage with the Stoker paradigm and learn about Victorian times, issues of race and colonization, sex and gender, illness, religion and the Enlightenment, as well as the novel’s relevance for today’s vampires and readers.
2. Next we investigate a German novel that introduces a rather unusual vampire figure: Patrick Süskind’s The Perfume (1985). Instead of drinking his victims’ blood, he inhales their scents – but still killing them in the process. Where Dracula represented, among other things, an archaic past that comes to haunt the present, Süskind’s Grenouille (‘frog’) personifies the dark side of Enlightenment.
3. Finally we probe contemporary representations of the vampire. This part is substantially driven by student presentations, which allows participants to develop and share their own interests and points-of-view, as well as raise relevant questions. Throughout the course we reflect on issues of self and society and develop a structured approach to critical thinking. Attention: There will be four film screenings scheduled outside of class, either on Mondays or Wednesdays 7-9:30pm (to be determined in class). Attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2016

Summer 2016

Language Courses

GER 100Y (GER) Introduction to German I

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 MTWR 6-8 CR103 L. Pehar / A. Warren

The GER 100Y language course is an introductory German course divided into two sections for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Based on a communicative and task-based approach, it is designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communication skills while providing students with knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultures of German-speaking countries. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of stimulating activities. Vocabulary will be presented in the context of culturally significant issues. Topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, travel, health and fitness or studying abroad. Additionally, the course will provide students with a foundation in a number of basic grammatical structures and concepts. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In addition to preparation at home, regular class attendance is paramount in order to participate successfully in these activities.

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 MTWR 6-8 CR406 S. Gargova / M. Burks

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

JGJ 360H1 (ENG) Holocaust in Literature

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 TR 12-3 TBA D. Bergen / A. Shternshis

Note: This course runs from May 3 to May 19, 2016. To enrol in the course, please contact the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies. Enrolment begins on April 5 and ends on May 4. To cancel this course, you need to contact the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies. Waiting lists are effective April 5 to May 4 only. Please note this course has different add, drop and CR/NCR opt-in/out dates and the refund schedule is different from regular F section code courses:
Last day to add course: May 4
Last day to cancel without academic penalty: May 16 (contact the Centre to drop the class)
Last day to add/remove CR option: May 16
Examination period: May 20 to May 27
Refund dates for JGJ360H1F
Refund: 100% – Deadline May 6
Refund: 75% – Deadline May 12
Refund: 50% – Deadline May 19

Spring 2016

Spring 2016

Language Courses

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 VC206 A. Bowes
L0201 MTWF 10-11 VC206 H.S. Kim
L0301 MTWF 11-12 VC212 H.S. Kim
*L0401 MTWF 12-1 VC101 (MWF), NF119 (T) A. Warren
L0501 MTWF 1-2 NF119 A. Warren
L0601 MW 2-4 NF004 S. Gargova
L0701 TR 10-12 TF200 A. Warren
*L5101 MW 6-8 AH204 A. Warren
L5102 MW 6-8 CR406 R. Muff
*L5201 TR 6-8 VC212 R. D’Souza

The GER 100Y language course is an introductory German course divided into two sections for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Based on a communicative and task-based approach, it is designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communication skills while providing students with knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultures of German-speaking countries. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of stimulating activities. Vocabulary will be presented in the context of culturally significant issues. Topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, travel, health and fitness or studying abroad. Additionally, the course will provide students with a foundation in a number of basic grammatical structures and concepts. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In addition to preparation at home, regular class attendance is paramount in order to participate successfully in these activities.

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 CR406 W. Ohm
L0201 MTWF 10-11 CR406 J. Wakelin
L0301 MTWF 11-12 CR406 V. Shanmuganathan
L5101 MW 6-8 TF102 T. Sudenis
L5201 TR 6-8 CR406 K. Heinz

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 CR403 S. Gargova
L0201 TR 10-12 UC85 (T), NF119 (R) E. Boran
L5101 MW 6-8 VC101 A. Stainton
L5201 TR 6-8 NF009 A. Stainton

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 260Y (ENG) Elementary Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 12-2, R 12-1 JH235 A. Shternshis

This course is an introduction to the Yiddish language and culture of Ashkenazic Jews. It will begin to prepare you to be able to express yourself in Yiddish, acquire strategies to learn Yiddish independently by developing your ability to understand the structure of the language and to cue in on the features of spoken and written Yiddish.

GER 463Y (ENG) Yiddish for German Speakers

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 12-2, R 12-1 JH235 A. Shternshis

The course is designed as an intensive Yiddish language training. The goal is to teach German speakers to read, write and speak in Yiddish. The curriculum relies on the German language skills of the students, and focuses on differences between Yiddish and German grammar and vocabulary. Upon the completion of the course, students should be able to read Yiddish literary texts with a minimal use of dictionary. Note: Graduate students can take the course in preparation for their Yiddish competency test.

Topic Courses

GER 150HS (ENG) German Culture & Civilization

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 2-4 AH400 E. Boran
Tutorials:
T0101 T 4-5 AH204 R. Muff
T5101 T 5-6 AH304 R. Muff
T5201 W 5-6 TF102 R. Muff

This course is for students who are pretty unfamiliar with German culture, and the goal is, simply put, to familiarize you with it. To do so, we’ll be highlighting various aspects of modern Germany: historical and cultural developments, poets and thinkers, radicals and liberals, scientists, artists and film stars, soccer players – and not to forget the Otto Normalverbraucher (i.e. the common man) who don’t make it into the headlines on a daily basis. What clichés abound about ‘Germany,’ how do we challenge them and take a look behind the façades? Will we find there anything more ‘real’? What is it about the Germans? Why are they hated? Why loved (Are they loved?) Or more to the point: Why is it so difficult to feel indifferent towards them? These are some of the questions we’ll be tackling this semester. The course puts you into the position of a culture detective whose task it is to explore in groups and on your own: You embark on a 12 – week mission, you collect evidence and reach conclusion. (Don’t take the analogy too far: There is no corpse! In fact, Germany is quite alive & kicking these days!) The course consists of lectures, viewing and discussing of film clips, group works and brief group presentations. In addition there is a one – hour tutorial each week.

GER 205HS (GER) German Literature I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-4, R 1-2 NF006 H.S. Kim

This prerequisite course offers an introduction to work methods and skills pertaining to the study of German literature. As such, the course is meant to provide a transition from language to topic courses. Students will receive training in how to give a successful presentation, how to read and analyze texts, how to find secondary literature and how to write short papers. The course is required for majors and specialists and a pre-requisite course for most of the other topic courses. It should be taken as early as possible.

GER 251HS (ENG) German & European Cinema

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 2-6 (incl. screening) Media Commons Theatre A. Fenner

An investigation of a stylistically diverse body of contemporary films thematizing the heightened mobility (social, economic, and spatial) that increasingly defines life in 21st-century German and European societies. Readings from social and cultural theory will be paired with weekly screenings whose compelling narratives capture disparate forms of volitional and enforced movement (migration, exile, job relocation, tourism, flanerie) as well as their modern antithesis – stasis and entrapment – following national nification, establishment of the Euro pean Union, and accelerated globalization. We will also examine how the search for new modes of storytelling finds expression in counter cinematic aesthetic, transnational film styles, minor modes of filmmaking, and the renewal of realist aesthetics.

GER 272HS (GER) Introduction to Business German

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 12-2, W 12-1 VC212 T. Sudenis

This course introduces students to basic concepts and vocabulary necessary for the German business context. All the language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) will be practiced in appropriate business contexts.

GER 275HS (ENG) Marx, Nietzsche, Freud

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-4 AH400 W. Goetschel
Tutorials:
T0101 R 1-2 AH204 B. Beizaei
T0201 R 2-3 AH206 B. Beizaei
T0301 R 3-4 AH206 B. Beizaei

This is an introductory course to the thought of Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Sigmund Freud and their pioneering contributions to the understanding of the individual and society in modernity. Readings include selections from writings of the early Marx, the Communist Manifesto, and Capital, Nietzsche’s critique of culture, academe, and nationalism, and Freud’s theory of culture, his views on the psychopathology of everyday life, on the meaning of dreams, symptoms, the return of the repressed, and what it might mean to live in a free society.

GER 310HS (GER) German Culture

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-4 CR406 A. Stainton

As the concept of culture in today’s world becomes more and more associated with globalisation and international influences, it seems appropriate to supersede the traditional question of ‘What is German culture?’ with the more open question of ‘Where is German culture?’ This course provides an introduction to contemporary German culture and its roots from 1945 onwards, focusing particularly on them es of travel and migration. The course will examine cultural texts and objects including poetry, prose, film, songs and old and new media forms. Sessions involve class discussions, group work, readings, and occasional lectures. The course will be taught in German.

GER 322HS (GER) Kafka in Context

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 2-4 NF113 J. Zilcosky

How do we know how to live life in the modern world, when none of our points of reference seem to hold any reliability or stability? How can we even be sure that we are human, and not some strange, deformed animal with consciousness? Are we perhaps moving through life in a dream, or a nightmare? For Kafka, the German-Jewish-Czech writer who lived most of his life in Prague, the only way to answer these and other similarly troubling questions was to make them the basis of his writing. His works offer a unique model for thinking about human life in the modern world, about consciousness, the body, dreaming and waking, the nature of the social world, and many similar issues. And embedded in his writing is a set of unique ideas about how to read literature. In this course we will set out in pursuit of his models and ideas.

GER 326HS (GER) Writing Memory

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 4-6 NF113 S. Soldovieri

German literature in the aftermath of World War II started from a new beginning, with many authors attempting to find a way of describing the shocking, nihilistic experience of war and devastation – often taking their cue from foreign models or existentialist and traditional Christian trains of thought. This course offers an examination of this post-War literature and culture from ‘Zero Hour’ through to contemporary debates about the Holocaust and its memorization. Texts by authors such as Günter Grass, Herinrich Böll, Ulrich Plenzdorf, Christa Wolf, Peter Schneider, Bernhard Schlink, Peter Weiss, Zafer Senocak and others.

GER 431HS (GER) Turkish-German Literature

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 2-4 OH323 E. Boran

Seit den 1960er Jahren bilden Türken die größte ethnische Minderheit in der Bundesrepublik. Mit ihnen kamen neue Impulse und Perspektiven.
Erst auf Türkisch, doch bald auch auf Deutsch reagierten die Migranten auf die neue Umgebung. Über die Jahre entstand eine türkisch-deutsche Kulturszene. Dieser Kurs betrachtet die 50-jährige Entwicklungsgeschichte türkisch-deutschen Kunstschaffens. Der Fokus der Sitzungen liegt je auf zentralen Künstlern und ihren Werken. Die Ziele des Kurses sind, die kulturell aktivste ethnische Minderheit der BRD und ihren Beitrag zur deutschen Kultur kennen zu lernen, die Merkmale türkisch-deutschen Kunstschaffens zu untersuchen (Stichwort: Kunst mit Akzent) und die deutsche Nachkriegsgeschichte aus dem Blickwinkel dieser Minorität zu betrachten.

GER 450HS (GER) Visual Culture

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-6 NF231 S. Soldovieri

What do the movies tell us about history? What does history tell us about the movies? Whether in the form of epic, farce, or costume drama, history has been a preferred subject since the beginnings of narrative film. The course explores the various ‘uses’ of history in the cinema, with a focus on German-language productions. We will examine the different modes in which German cinemas have engaged and continue to engage German history and how they shape the public memory of historical events. The course films will draw on all eras of German Cinema.

CCR 199HS (ENG) The Grail

L0251 M 3-5 WE74 M. Stock

The course investigates one of the most potent cultural symbols: the Grail. The course traces the history of this object back to its origins in the European imagination of the High Middle Ages. Topics of the course include the Grail’s prominent roots in medieval European culture and the significance of Christianity and medieval chivalric culture for these roots; Grail narratives in high medieval European literature; imaginations of a ‘Grail castle’ and a ‘Grail realm;’ and how medieval audiences linked the Grail to fabulous notions of ‘India’ and ‘Asia.’ In a second step, the course moves on to modern renderings of the Grail and new Grail narratives, especially in opera and film.

CCR 199HS (ENG) Technology and the Human

L0252 W 10-12 SS2101 C. Lehleiter

Technology has changed our lives: from railway to car and plane, from telegraph to phone and e-mail, and from wooden artificial limbs to organic prosthetics, scientific knowledge has enhanced human capacities. At the same time, though, this development is also experienced as a threat: killing missiles, controlling ‘Big Brothers,’ and frightening monstrous creatures are the flip-side of technological advancement. This course examines the following questions: What is the relationship between technology and the “human”? Can there be progress of technology without a regress of humanity? Or is technology liberating us from the bonds of nature? We will discuss possible answers by looking at some of the most relevant materials in literature, philosophy, and cultural history (including film) from the eighteenth century to Post-Modernity. However, we do not want to deal with this pressing topic only theoretically. Since technology does not remain in the ivory tower of academia but concerns our every-day life, we will strive to find our own stance towards technology by observing our daily experiences. Therefore, some of the assignments will prompt you to explore your own technological environment.

CCR 199Y (ENG) Our Vampires, Ourselves

L0251 T 2-4 SS1069 E. Boran

This course examines the figure of the vampire as a potent cultural metaphor showing how every age embraces the vampire it needs and gets the vampire it deserves. Our course consists of three parts:
1. First we focus on the best-known and most influential vampire novel: Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). We critically engage with the Stoker paradigm and learn about Victorian times, issues of race and colonization, sex and gender, illness, religion and the Enlightenment, as well as the novel’s relevance for today’s vampires and readers.
2. Next we investigate a German novel that introduces a rather unusual vampire figure: Patrick Süskind’s The Perfume (1985). Instead of drinking his victims’ blood, he inhales their scents – but still killing them in the process. Where Dracula represented, among other things, an archaic past that comes to haunt the present, Süskind’s Grenouille (‘frog’) personifies the dark side of Enlightenment.
3. Finally we probe contemporary representations of the vampire. This part is substantially driven by student presentations, which allows participants to develop and share their own interests and points-of-view, as well as raise relevant questions. Throughout the course we reflect on issues of self and society and develop a structured approach to critical thinking. Attention: There will be four film screenings scheduled outside of class, either on Mondays or Wednesdays 7-9:30pm (to be determined in class). Attendance is mandatory.

Fall 2015

Fall 2015

Language Courses

GER 100Y/*102Y1/101H1 (GER) Introduction to German I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 VC206 D. Khamseh
L0201 MTWF 10-11 VC206 H.S. Kim
L0301 MTWF 11-12 AH107 (MTF), NF006 (F) H.S. Kim
*L0401 MTWF 12-1 VC101 (MWF), NF119 (T) B. Nimani-Gashi
L0501 MTWF 1-2 NF119 V. Rummel
L0601 MW 2-4 NF004 S. Gargova
L0701 TR 10-12 TF 200 J. Zilcosky
*L5101 MW 6-8 VC212 S. Gargova
L5102 MW 6-8 CR406 J. El-Cassabgui
*L5201 TR 6-8 VC212 W. Horsfall

The GER 100Y language course is an introductory German course divided into two sections for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Based on a communicative and task-based approach, it is designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communication skills while providing students with knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultures of German-speaking countries. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of stimulating activities. Vocabulary will be presented in the context of culturally significant issues. Topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, travel, health and fitness or studying abroad. Additionally, the course will provide students with a foundation in a number of basic grammatical structures and concepts. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In addition to preparation at home, regular class attendance is paramount in order to participate successfully in these activities.

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 CR406 Y. Aly
L0201 MTWF 10-11 CR406 V. Rummel
L0301 MTWF 11-12 CR406 V. Rummel
L5101 MW 6-8 TF102 T. Sudenis
L5201 TR 6-8 CR406 E. Luzi

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 CR403 E. Boran
L0201 TR 10-12 NF006 E. Boran
L5101 MW 6-8 VC101 C. Bohnke
L5201 TR 6-8 NF009 V. Shanmuganathan

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 400F (GER) Advanced German

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 NF004 Y. Aly

This course is aimed at students with a high level of competence in German. Building on material covered in GER 100/200/300, it offers advanced studies of German language, including text-based analysis and with a focus on improving communication skills. It includes a systematic review and expansion of grammar and stylistics, and additional emphasis lies on vocabulary building. The course is partly based on newspaper articles, literary texts, films and websites.

GER 260Y (ENG) Elementary Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 12-2, R 12-1 OH323 V. Lightstone

This course is an introduction to the Yiddish language and culture of Ashkenazic Jews. It will begin to prepare you to be able to express yourself in Yiddish, acquire strategies to learn Yiddish independently by developing your ability to understand the structure of the language and to cue in on the features of spoken and written Yiddish.

GER 360HF (ENG) Intermediate Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 3-5, R 3-4 T: JH214, R: JH235 A. Shternshis

This course will help you write, speak, and understand Yiddish better. We will use College Yiddish as a primary textbook. We will also read original Yiddish poetry, prose, and press, study Yiddish songs, jokes and folklore. In addition, there will be a guest lecture presented (by native Yiddish speakers of Toronto community).

GER 463Y (ENG) Yiddish for German Speakers

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 12-2, R 12-1 JH235 A. Shternshis

The course is designed as an intensive Yiddish language training. The goal is to teach German speakers to read, write and speak in Yiddish. The curriculum relies on the German language skills of the students, and focuses on differences between Yiddish and German grammar and vocabulary. Upon the completion of the course, students should be able to read Yiddish literary texts with a minimal use of dictionary. Note: Graduate students can take the course in preparation for their Yiddish competency test.

Topic Courses

GER 270HF (ENG) Money and Economy

Section Time Room Instructor
T0101 M 12-2, W 12-1 CR406 C. Lehleiter

In this course, we examine key literary, philosophical, and cultural texts, in order to understand how modern culture approaches problems such as property, debt, and exchange value.

GER 305HF (GER) German Literature II

Section Time Room Instructor
T0101 M 1-3, W 1-2 VC101 C. Bohnke

This course provides an introduction to German literature and culture from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. Within a chronological framework, we will read and analyze excerpts from representative works of major German writers. Some of the literary texts will be complemented with examples selected from the visual arts, music and film. Throughout the course, our focus will be on three sets of questions: 1. What is the leading question of the text? 2. What are the formal means that the authors employ in order to express their concerns and to conceptualize the topic under discussion? 3. What is the historical and cultural context of the text? By asking these questions, we will not only strive to come to a better understanding of individual works, but also of German literature, its developments and themes. However, although the structure of this course is governed by literary periods, it will also be our aim to question their validity and definition. We will approach the texts with a combination of close readings and broad historical and cultural perspectives. Among the authors we will discuss are Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Joseph von Eichendorff, Franz Kafka, Irmgard Keun and Ilse Aichinger. In addition, we will work on our reading techniques for primary and secondary literature and improve our research skills in the university library system. Sessions involve class discussions, group work, readings, and occasional lectures.

GER 320HF (GER) The Age of Goethe

Section Time Room Instructor
T0101 M 3-5 NF006 W. Goetschel

Germany’s most famous poet, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, lived from 1749 to 1832. Arguably, his lifetime spanned the end of the feudal age and the rise of the modern period in Germany. The French Revolution shook the world when he was 40, and the daring experiments of the Romantic poets burst onto the artistic scene in the decade after that. Napoleon brought the Holy Roman Empire to an end as Hegel was completing his Phenomenolgie des Geistes in 1806. Three years later, Goethe produced what he considered his “best book” Die Wahlverwandtschaf-ten. And in the coming years, as the German political landscaped was changed by war and reform movements, Heinrich von Kleist and E. T. A. Hoffmann produced remarkable and troubling works of fiction. Our aim in this course is to provide a survey of this innovating period in German literature.

GER 323HF (GER) Weimar Culture & Beyond

Section Time Room Instructor
T0101 W 2-4 NF119 A. Gerstner

The political instability of the Weimar Republic, fueled by the effects of the Global Economic Crisis, facilitated Hitler’s election in 1933. Yet at the same time it was a period of extraordinary political, social and artistic achievements. Expressionism, Dada, Neue Sachlichkeit, Bauhaus, and the Golden Age of German Film are some of the buzz words which belong to the legacy of Weimar. This course studies literary, historical, and artistic documents of this extremely significant period in German history.

GER 411HF Introduction to Critical Theory (ENG)

Section Time Room Instructor
T0101 W 3-6 AH100 W. Goetschel

This course on current debates in critical theory will familiarize students with some of the key issues in critical theory today, and provide the background to these debates. The course content varies from year to year, so check the departmental website for details.

CCR 199Y (ENG) Our Vampires, Ourselves

Section Time Room Instructor
L0251 T 2-4 SS 2128 E. Boran

This course examines the figure of the vampire as a potent cultural metaphor showing how every age embraces the vampire it needs and gets the vampire it deserves. Our course consists of three parts:
1. First we focus on the best-known and most influential vampire novel: Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). We critically engage with the Stoker paradigm and learn about Victorian times, issues of race and colonization, sex and gender, illness, religion and the Enlightenment, as well as the novel’s relevance for today’s vampires and readers.
2. Next we investigate a German novel that introduces a rather unusual vampire figure: Patrick Süskind’s The Perfume (1985). Instead of drinking his victims’ blood, he inhales their scents – but still killing them in the process. Where Dracula represented, among other things, an archaic past that comes to haunt the present, Süskind’s Grenouille (‘frog’) personifies the dark side of Enlightenment.
3. Finally we probe contemporary representations of the vampire. This part is substantially driven by student presentations, which allows participants to develop and share their own interests and points-of-view, as well as raise relevant questions. Throughout the course we reflect on issues of self and society and develop a structured approach to critical thinking. Attention: There will be four film screenings scheduled outside of class, either on Mondays or Wednesdays 7-9:30pm (to be determined in class). Attendance is mandatory.

Summer 2015

Summer 2015

Language Courses

GER 100Y (GER) Introduction to German I

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 MTWR 6-8 AH107 E. Luzi

The GER 100Y language course is an introductory German course divided into two sections for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Based on a communicative and task-based approach, it is designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communication skills while providing students with knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultures of German-speaking countries. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of stimulating activities. Vocabulary will be presented in the context of culturally significant issues. Topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, travel, health and fitness or studying abroad. Additionally, the course will provide students with a foundation in a number of basic grammatical structures and concepts. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In addition to preparation at home, regular class attendance is paramount in order to participate successfully in these activities.

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 MTWR 6-8 AP120 V. Pfeiffer / J. Wakelin

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

Spring 2015

Spring 2015

Language Courses

GER 100Y/101HS/102Y1* (GER) Introduction to German I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 CR406 Y. Aly
L0201 MTWF 10-11 CR406 Y. Aly
L0301 MTWF 11-12 AB114 L. Pehar
*L0401 MTWF 12-1 CR406 R. D’Souza
L0501 MTWF 1-2 NF119 T. Sudenis
L0601 MW 2-4 VC206 A. Warren
L0701 TR 10-12 TF201 H.S. Kim
*L5101 MW 6-8 CR403 L. Pehar
*L5201 TR 6-8 EM108 A. Stainton
L5202 TR 6-8 EM302 L. Pehar

The GER 100Y1Y language course is an introductory German course divided into two sections for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Based on a communicative and task-based approach, it is designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communication skills while providing students with knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultures of German-speaking countries. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of stimulating activities. Vocabulary will be presented in the context of culturally significant issues. Topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, travel, health and fitness or studying abroad. Additionally, the course will provide students with a foundation in a number of basic grammatical structures and concepts.
Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In addition to preparation at home, regular class attendance is paramount in order to participate successfully in these activities.

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 VC211 T. Sudenis
L0201 MTWF 10-11 TF102 T. Sudenis
L0301 MTWF 11-12 CR406 M. Hager
L5101 MW 6-8 TF102 A. Stainton

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 NF007 H. Van Bael
L0201 TR 10-12 TF200 V. Shanmuganathan
L5101 MW 6-8 CR405 N. Vohringer

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount

GER 260Y (ENG) Elementary Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 12-2, R 1-2 JH235 A. Shternshis

This course is an introduction to the Yiddish language and culture of Ashkenazic Jews. It will begin to prepare you to be able to express yourself in Yiddish, acquire strategies to learn Yiddish independently by developing your ability to understand the structure of the language and to cue in on the features of spoken and written Yiddish.

GER 462S (ENG) Advanced Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 R 2-4 JH235 A. Shternshis

Advanced reading, writing, vocabulary and conversation. Study of poetry, short fiction and memoir literature by Zeitlin, Bergelson, Gladshteyn, Sholem Aleichem and I.B. Singer. Selected advanced grammatical topics presented in conjunction with the study of texts. (Con
ducted entirely in Yiddish.)

Topic Courses

GER 150S (ENG) German Culture & Civilization

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 4-6 AH400 E. Boran
Tutorials: T 4-5, T 5-6, W 5-6 L0101/5101/5201 in AH204 A. Stainton
L0102 in TF103, 5102 in TF102, 5202 in TF203 K. Heinz
This course is for students who are pretty unfamiliar with German culture, and the goal is, simply put, to familiarize you with it. To do so, we’ll be highlighting various aspects of modern Germany: historical and cultural developments, poets and thinkers, radicals and liberals, scientists, artists and film stars, soccer players – and not to forget the Otto Normalverbraucher (i.e. the common man) who don’t make it into the headlines on a daily basis. What clichés abound about ‘Germany,’ how do we challenge them and take a look behind the façades? Will we find there anything more ‘real’? What is it about the Germans? Why are they hated? Why loved (Are they loved?) Or more to the point: Why is it so difficult to feel indifferent towards them? These are some of the questions we’ll be tackling this semester. The course puts you into the position of a culture detective whose task it is to explore in groups and on your own: You embark on a 12 – week mission, you collect evidence and reach conclusion. (Don’t take the analogy too far: There is no corpse! In fact, Germany is quite alive & kicking these days!) The course consists of lectures, viewing and discussing of film clips, group works and brief group presentations. In addition there is a one – hour tutorial each week.

GER 175S (ENG) German Cultural Studies: Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-4, Tutorial R 1-2, 2-3, 3-4 AH400, Tutorials in AH204 W. Goetschel, Tutorials: B. Beizaei

This is an introductory course to the thought of Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Sigmund Freud and their pioneering contributions to the understanding of the individual and society in modernity. Readings include selections from writings of the early Marx, the Communist Manifesto, and Capital, Nietzsche’s critique of culture, academe, and nationalism, and Freud’s theory of culture, his views on the psychopathology of everyday life, on the meaning of dreams, symptoms, the return of the repressed, and what it might mean to live in a free society.

GER 205S (GER) Introduction to German Literature I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 12-2, R 12-1 NF004 A. Warren

This course offers an introduction to the study of literature in German. It is aimed at students who have been studying German language for 3 semesters, and are continuing with their 4th semester concurrently with the course. It is intended as a continuing course in language competence, but also an introduction to reading literature in German. We will be reading a number of short literary texts and a few non-fiction texts, specifically with the aim of expanding your working knowledge of the German language, and familiarizing yourself with the subtleties of literary language. As such, the course is meant to provide a transition from the study of language to the topic-based literature courses offered in undergraduate studies in German. Students will receive training in how to read and analyze texts, and how to understand “grammar at work” in literature. Classes will involve reading, discussions, group work, and exercises. Reading assignments will be in German. As far as possible, the classroom language will be German.

GER 250S (ENG) Recent Trends in German Cinema

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 1-5 (incl. 2 hours of viewing) VC101 A. Fenner

In this 25th anniversary year of the Berlin Republic, this course takes stock of the extraordinary proliferation and diversification of output in recent German cinema. We will examine how these films engage key issues facing the state and its populace since unification, but also trends in how they’ve been theorized and interpreted in historiographical scholarship of the past decade. Topics explored will include the legacy of East German communism, the commodification of history on film as well as the cinephilic citation of film history itself, globalization processes and their economic and social impact, the consolidation of the European Union, and Germany’s emerging status as multicultural nation. We will also take account of the transformation of film financing and material production circumstances as a result of European funding structures, and contemplate whether it is possible to discern an emergent ‘transnational aesthetic.’ Both big budget blockbusters and independent films will be considered in regard to the implications for film content, style, and social content.

GER 310S (GER) Contemporary German Culture and Media

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 R 6-8 NF113 Y. Aly

As the concept of culture in today’s world becomes more and more associated with globalisation and international influences, it seems appropriate to supersede the traditional question of ‘What is German culture?’ with the more open question of ‘Where is German culture?’ This course provides an introduction to contemporary German culture and its roots from 1945 onwards, focusing particularly on them es of travel and migration. The course will examine cultural texts and objects including poetry, prose, film, songs and old and new media forms. Sessions involve class discussions, group work, readings, and occasional lectures. The course will be taught in German.

GER 336S (GER) Focus on Berlin

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-4 TF201 S. Soldovieri

“Sich in einer Stadt nicht zurechtfinden heißt nicht viel. In einer Stadt sich zu verirren, wie man in einem Walde sich verirrt, braucht Schulung.” Walter Benjamin,“Berliner Kindheit”
Taking as our inspiration Benjamin’s seemingly paradoxical notion of the training required to “get lost” in the city, this course will consist of a set of cultural excursions into Berlin’s past and present. Focusing for the most part on the Twentieth Century, we will explore a range of literary, filmic, architectural, and historical texts charting Berlin’s shifting identity as an industrial metropolis, centre of Nazi Germany, divided cold war city and finally its postmodern reinvention as the capital of the ‘Berlin Republic.’

GER 340S (GER) German Theater Production

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 T/R 6-8 BR200 E. Boran

After a fiercely comical production of Friedrich Dürrenmatt’s Physicists in 2010 and a weirdly scary one of Drakul(j)a in 2013, this year’s project is an adaptation of Günter Grass’ Hochwasser, a slightly absurd play about humans and beasts stranded in a house together. Outside, there is rain, nothing but rain. The waters are rising, and soon the protagonists are faced with a flood of almost biblical proportions. While strange visitors invade the house, rats, soaking wet, are trapped on the roof and reflect on God and the world.
“Rats are humans too,” one character claims and, sure enough, when the humans are finally forced to head to the roof, they gradually turn into rats themselves. The class is limited to 20 participants, but don’t be deterred: If it’s full, simply put yourself on the waiting list and attend session 1 anyway. Some students are bound to drop the course. If you miss the first weeks – registered or not – you may not take the course. (Please check the detailed course syllabus under Course Syllabi.)
http://erolaner.wix.com/theater-du

GER 367S (ENG) Holocaust in Literature

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 10-12 SS1085 A. Shternshis & D. Bergen

Topics in modern Yiddish or German Jewish literature and culture from the beginning of the 19th century to the present, featuring a selection of readings of modern Yiddish prose, poetry, drama and cinema. (Taught in English and open to students across disciplines.)

GER 372S (GER) German Business Culture 2

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MWF 12-1 VC206 M. Hager

This course is designed as a fourth year language course for students who have completed at least the first three years of college German or the equivalent. Course objectives are to increase the student’s proficiency in the four skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) – with special emphasis on selected German business topics to help the student better understand the German business world.

GER 426S (GER) Introduction to Medieval German

Section Time Room Instructor
L5101 M 5-8 VC304 M. Stock

This course offers an introduction to the German language, literature, and culture of the Middle Ages. We will read and translate Middle High German texts, study facsimiles of medieval manuscripts, and inquire into epochal cultural concepts like courtly love and chivalry as well as courtly and clerical designs of identity. Authors discussed will include Hartmann von Aue and Walther von der Vogelweide among others. The course fulfills the departmental requirement in Middle High German.

GER 430S (ENG) Goethe’s Novels

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 3-5 AH103 J. Noyes

From the moment he published his first novel, Die Leiden des jungen Werther, at the age of 24 to the appearance of Wilhelm Meister’s Wanderjahre three years before his death, Goethe’s novels set the tone for prose writing in German. His novels are daring, bold, experimental, never satisfied with repeating formula or meeting reader – expectations. In this course we will read all of Goethe’s novels. It is a cross-listed graduate and senior undergraduate course. The classroom language is English. Students in the German department are expected to read the novels in German. For students in Comparative Literature, all the novels are available in English translation.

CCR 199S (ENG) Circles of Celluloid

Section Time Room Instructor
L0251 W 1-5 SS1080 S. Soldovieri

The remake is as old as the cinematic medium itself. In many ways film is ‘repetition’ – the recycling of other films and literature. Films are forms of repetition in series, different cuts or versions (as the result of censorship, synchronization, restoration, etc). In fact the very first film by the Lumière brothers, La sortie de l’usine Lumière à Lyon’ (1895), exists simultaneously in three variations. And films are structured by repetitions in the form of intertextual associations, processes of cultural flow and exchange, visual and aural quotes, homages, etc. The course will explore the remake phenomenon in its historical, industrial, transnational and theoretical dimensions.

CCR 199Y (ENG) Our Vampires, Ourselves

Section Time Room Instructor
L0251 R 10-12 UC87 E. Boran

This course examines the figure of the vampire as a potent cultural metaphor showing how every age embraces the vampire it needs and gets the vampire it deserves. Our course consists of three parts:
1. First we focus on the best-known and most influential vampire novel: Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). We critically engage with the Stoker paradigm and learn about Victorian times, issues of race and colonization, sex and gender, illness, religion and the Enlightenment, as well as the novel’s relevance for today’s vampires and readers.
2. Next we investigate a German novel that introduces a rather unusual vampire figure: Patrick Süskind’s The Perfume (1985). Instead of drinking his victims’ blood, he inhales their scents – but still killing them in the process. Where Dracula represented, among other things, an archaic past that comes to haunt the present, Süskind’s Grenouille (‘frog’) personifies the dark side of Enlightenment.
3. Finally we probe contemporary representations of the vampire. This part is substantially driven by student presentations, which allows participants to develop and share their own interests and points-of-view, as well as raise relevant questions. Throughout the course we reflect on issues of self and society and develop a structured approach to critical thinking. Attention: There will be four film screenings scheduled outside of class, either on Mondays or Wednesdays 7-9:30pm (to be determined in class). Attendance is mandatory.

Fall 2014

Fall 2014

Language Courses

GER 100Y/102Y1* (GER) Introduction to German I

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 CR406 D. Khamseh
L0201 MTWF 9-10 CR406 D. Khamseh
L0301 MTWF 11-12 BA3116 M. Swatuk
*L0401 MTWF 12-1 CR406 W. Ohm
L0501 MTWF 1-2 CR406 C. Miller
L0601 MW 2-4 VC212 C. Bohnke
L0701 TR 10-12 TF201 H.S. Kim
*L5101 MW 6-8 CR403 E. Luzi
*L5201 TR 6-8 EM108 E. Boran
L5202 TR 6-8 EM302 C. Miller

The GER 100Y1Y language course is an introductory German course divided into two sections for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Based on a communicative and task-based approach, it is designed to develop proficiency in oral and written communication skills while providing students with knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultures of German-speaking countries. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of stimulating activities. Vocabulary will be presented in the context of culturally significant issues. Topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, travel, health and fitness or studying abroad. Additionally, the course will provide students with a foundation in a number of basic grammatical structures and concepts.
Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In addition to preparation at home, regular class attendance is paramount in order to participate successfully in these activities.

GER 200Y (GER) Introduction to German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MTWF 9-10 VC211 H.S. Kim
L0201 MTWF 10-11 TF102 M. Hager
L0301 MTWF 11-12 CR406 M. Hager
L5101 MW 6-8 TF102 V. Pfeiffer

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount.

GER 300Y (GER) Intermediate German II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 VC211 C. Bohnke
L0201 TR 10-12 TF200 H. Van Bael
L5101 MW 6-8 CR405 V. Melnykevych

This language course will provide students with genuine communication experiences in order to deepen their understanding of German-speaking countries. It has been designed to further develop communicative proficiency in each of the four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbooks are motivating and encourage interest in culture and language through their unique approach to authentic material illustrating vocabulary in context, communicative functions of grammatical structures, and cultural highlights. All readings, videos, projects, and presentations in class explore historical, social, political, and popular topics while aspects of Germanic and North American cultures are being compared. Learning strategies and self-assessment are part of every chapter, allowing for differentiation among various types of learners. The topics cover areas such as introducing and talking about oneself, shopping, telling time and recounting a day, family life, describing and renting an apartment, health and fitness etc. Cultural and linguistic variants of all three German-speaking countries are featured. Class periods will be devoted mostly to communicative and interactive exercises. In order to participate successfully in these activities, preparation at home and regular class attendance are paramount

GER 400F (GER) Advanced German Practice

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MW 10-12 VC212 M. Burks

This course is aimed at students with a high level of competence in German. Building on material covered in GER 100/200/300, it offers advanced studies of German language, including text-based analysis and with a focus on improving communication skills. It includes a systematic review and expansion of grammar and stylistics, and additional emphasis lies on vocabulary building. The course is partly based on newspaper articles, literary texts, films and websites.

GER 260Y (ENG) Elementary Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 12-2, R 1-2 JH235 A. Shternshis

This course is an introduction to the Yiddish language and culture of Ashkenazic Jews. It will begin to prepare you to be able to express yourself in Yiddish, acquire strategies to learn Yiddish independently by developing your ability to understand the structure of the language and to cue in on the features of spoken and written Yiddish.

GER 360F (ENG) Intermediate Yiddish

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-3, R 2-4 JH235 A. Shternshis

This course will help you write, speak, and understand Yiddish better. We will use College Yiddish as a primary textbook. We will also read original Yiddish poetry, prose, and press, study Yiddish songs, jokes and folklore. In addition, there will be a guest lecture presented (by native Yiddish speakers of Toronto community).

Topic Courses

GER 240F (ENG) German Drama in Translation

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 4-6, Tutorial W 4-5, 5-6 TF102 E. Boran

This course offers a window into salient moments in 19th/20th century German drama. We study texts within their historical context in terms of such aspects as theme, plot, structure, characterization, style & language, and we examine aspects of their realization (& potential for realization) on stage. Course emphasis is on the reading & discussion of the texts. In addition, we pay attention to dramatic theory and to practical aspects of theater productions. Course Goals: Gain insight into the literary form of drama and the development of German drama, as well as its realization on stage and adaptation to film.

GER 305F (GER) Introduction to German Literature II

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 1-3, W 1-2 AH400 A. Gerstner

This course provides an introduction to German literature and culture from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. Within a chronological framework, we will read and analyze excerpts from representative works of major German writers. Some of the literary texts will be complemented with examples selected from the visual arts, music and film. Throughout the course, our focus will be on three sets of questions: 1. What is the leading question of the text? 2. What are the formal means that the authors employ in order to express their concerns and to conceptualize the topic under discussion? 3. What is the historical and cultural context of the text? By asking these questions, we will not only strive to come to a better understanding of individual works, but also of German literature, its developments and themes. However, although the structure of this course is governed by literary periods, it will also be our aim to question their validity and definition. We will approach the texts with a combination of close readings and broad historical and cultural perspectives. Among the authors we will discuss are Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Joseph von Eichendorff, Franz Kafka, Irmgard Keun and Ilse Aichinger. In addition, we will work on our reading techniques for primary and secondary literature and improve our research skills in the university library system. Sessions involve class discussions, group work, readings, and occasional lectures.

GER 330F (GER) Introduction to Poetry

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 2-3, R 2-4 NF004 Y. Aly

Poetry provides an excellent way of looking at German culture through art. The foundation of the course will be close reading and of poems in the German language across a variety of subgenres through different epochs. The texts we read & discuss are (mostly) short & (always) challenging and allow for ample contextualization and interpretation. The course will be taught in German. Some of the poems may be available in English translation, but close reading and class discussions will be based on the German originals.

GER 332F (GER) Deviance, Madness, Outsiders in Literature

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 T 1-3 TF201 J. Noyes

What does it mean to be sane? To be normal? To be human? Throughout modern history, writers have tested the limits of normal human experience by casting their protagonists into the depths of madness and following them through their trials, their elation, their despair. In a speech in 1970 Michel Foucault pointed out what he called “a curious affinity between literature and madness. Literary language is not constrained by the rules of everyday language. For example, it is not subject to the severe rule of constant truth-telling, any more than the teller is under the obligation to always remain sincere in what he thinks and feels. In short, unlike the words of politics or the sciences, those of literature occupy a marginal position with respect to everyday language.” Taking these ideas as our starting point, we will examine a number of texts written between 1800 and 1970. Our aim will be to analyze the literary descriptions of the limit experiences that separate sanity from madness. In the process, we will discuss topics such as truth and truth telling, exclusionary and assimilating practices for dealing with madness, discourses of containment, and how the outsider perspective of madness unsettles truth in literature.

GER 370F (GER) German Business Culture 1

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 MWF 12-1 VC206 M. Hager

This course has been designed to provide students with practical experience setting up their own company while reviewing and supplementing material from Deutsch im Berufsalltag with information from other authentic texts. This course meets three times a week. “The project” found in Deutsch im Berufsalltag will be used as guidelines for setting up a fictive German company.

GER 423F (GER) Transnational Literatures

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 W 2-4 IN223 A. Fenner

Our understanding of the defining parameters of German cultural production has dramatically transformed in the course of the latter 20th-century and beyond. Both literary and filmic output are now defined by an unprecedented heterogeneity in form, thematics, and language. This is attributable not only to the dramatic changes in national self-understanding to which Germany has been subject since 1945 through the respective founding of the Federal and Democratic Republics, the ensuing construction of the Wall, and its demise 50 years later amidst unification. The recruitment of foreign labour to both Germanies beginning in the 1950s also infused new cultural perspectives; today, authors of extraordinarily diverse background – both recent arrivals to Germany and those of the second and third generation – continue to vitalize the parameters of what constitutes German cultural production. This seminar takes stock of a cross-section of literary, and to a limited extent, also filmic texts that provoke us to rethink the linguistic and cultural bounds of German culture. The thematics of crossing boundaries, or indeed, of their dissolution will surface across a swath of texts now identified as transnational in scope and thrust.

CCR 199F (ENG) The Grail

Section Time Room Instructor
L0101 M 3-5 LM123 M. Stock

The course investigates one of the most potent cultural symbols: the Grail. The course traces the history of this object back to its origins in the European imagination of the High Middle Ages. Topics of the course include the Grail’s prominent roots in medieval European culture and the significance of Christianity and medieval chivalric culture for these roots; Grail narratives in high medieval European literature; imaginations of a ‘Grail castle’ and a ‘Grail realm;’ and how medieval audiences linked the Grail to fabulous notions of ‘India’ and ‘Asia.’ In a second step, the course moves on to modern renderings of the Grail and new Grail narratives, especially in opera and film.

CCR 199Y (ENG) Our Vampires, Ourselves

Section Time Room Instructor
L0251 R 10-12 UC87 E. Boran

This course examines the figure of the vampire as a potent cultural metaphor showing how every age embraces the vampire it needs and gets the vampire it deserves. Our course consists of three parts:
1. First we focus on the best-known and most influential vampire novel: Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). We critically engage with the Stoker paradigm and learn about Victorian times, issues of race and colonization, sex and gender, illness, religion and the Enlightenment, as well as the novel’s relevance for today’s vampires and readers.
2. Next we investigate a German novel that introduces a rather unusual vampire figure: Patrick Süskind’s The Perfume (1985). Instead of drinking his victims’ blood, he inhales their scents – but still killing them in the process. Where Dracula represented, among other things, an archaic past that comes to haunt the present, Süskind’s Grenouille (‘frog’) personifies the dark side of Enlightenment.
3. Finally we probe contemporary representations of the vampire. This part is substantially driven by student presentations, which allows participants to develop and share their own interests and points-of-view, as well as raise relevant questions. Throughout the course we reflect on issues of self and society and develop a structured approach to critical thinking. Attention: There will be four film screenings scheduled outside of class, either on Mondays or Wednesdays 7-9:30pm (to be determined in class). Attendance is mandatory.